Summer Programs

Summer Programs

While it may be cold and snowy outside, we have entered the season of summer program applications! We get a lot of questions from parents about summer programs, including what we know or recommend or how to even begin the process of looking for programs. While everyone has different goals when conducting their search, we can give you an idea of how to begin:

What does their teacher recommend?

Your child’s teachers are a valuable resource. They know your child’s musical strengths, and will have a good idea of what programs might be appropriate. They will have suggestions based on your child’s ability, commitment, and interest.

Where do your children want to go?

Don’t forget to consult the person attending the program! Some may have no idea, but others will have something in mind. While their goals may not be realistic for one reason or another (or maybe they are, in which case, jackpot!), it will give you an idea of the type of experience they are looking for. You can frame your search with that in mind.

What kind of program are you looking for?

What is your goal? Programs are centered around different aspects of playing an instrument. For example, some focus exclusively on chamber music, individual practice, or orchestral playing. Others combine them. If the goal is to gain more orchestral experience, going to a chamber music or fiddle program will not serve this purpose. Want to try a new genre of music? An orchestral program focused on standard repertoire is not a likely candidate. Confine your search to what type of experience you are looking for.

What is your budget?

For some, this is the deciding factor. Work within what you and your family are comfortable spending. However, like applying for college, many programs offer scholarships or work/study arrangements, so don’t let price alone make your decision. Cast a wide net when possible and see what kinds of scholarships might be available to you.

Additional Considerations:

Length: Programs range anywhere from one week to eight. Some students can handle the longer sessions, while others are not ready for an eight weeks away from home. This is a personal decision based on your child and your family. Again, your child’s teacher is a great resource if you are not sure whether a longer or shorter session is a better fit.

Distance: How far away are you looking? A program may look amazing but be hundreds of miles or even an ocean away. Consider travel expenses in your budget as well as how comfortable your child is being a long way from home.

Age Range: This is very important. There are programs that cater to both small and wide age ranges. It may be possible to have a high school student in a group with college students, or middle with high school. This can be beneficial, but this is a personal choice. They may have the skills to keep up with someone considerably older, but they may not have the emotional maturity to thrive socially. You want to make sure that your child has a great experience both inside of rehearsal and out.

 

Applications are due soon, so make sure you check out the due dates and materials needed. While geared toward college hopefuls, our post on applying to music school has a lot of great tips that are also relevant to summer program applications.

You can find a list of programs in the US on our website here and a list of international programs here.

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Copyright © 2015 · All Rights Reserved · Silvija Kristapsons

 

Applying to Music School

Applying to Music School Photo

It’s that time of year: college application season. Deadlines may seem a long way off, but do not be deceived;

They will sneak up on you.

If you are looking to study music, now is the time to begin if you have not already. Some things to keep in mind when you’re applying to music schools:

Decide what kind of program you want. Do you want a conservatory where the sole focus of your studies is music, or a music school within a university/college so you can take outside classes as well? There are advantages to both, but ultimately you need to decide what works best for you. This is not to say you can only apply to one or the other–many people apply to both, and some variety in your options down the road can be a great asset. When you are vetting prospective schools, it is a good thought to have in the back of your mind.

Be careful of how many schools you apply to. Remember, as a musician you will need to audition at all of these schools and possibly send in pre-screening materials. That friend who’s looking to study political science and is applying to twelve schools? That friend does not have to do ten auditions at ten different schools with ten different repertoire lists on top of the regular application process. Know how much you can handle, and don’t schedule so many auditions that you are overwhelmed.

Know which application you need to fill out. Some use the Common Application, others a common conservatory site, and still others have their own application process. Double check each school’s website you are applying to if you aren’t sure what materials are required or on what platform they need to be submitted.

Get your prescreening materials in on time. If you are a violinist or cellist, most if not all schools will have some sort of prescreening process. The best case scenario is to have all of your repertoire learned by the beginning of October so that you can be ready to send recordings in November/December. Make sure you follow the guidelines detailed by the school–your recording could be incredible, but if it’s not the repertoire or the format requested you could be shooting yourself in the foot. This is the easiest way to weed out applicants: if you don’t follow directions, they won’t waste their time.

One last thing about prescreening recordings: do not cut in the middle of the piece. Most schools are fine with a cut in between pieces, but they do not want to hear or see any editing during. Think of it like a live audition: you don’t get to stop in the middle and start over. If you’re ever unsure, check the school’s website or call the admissions office.

If possible, visit the schools and attend performances. This will give you an idea of what kind of repertoire, caliber, and school culture to expect. If you can’t go in person, many schools have performances recorded on their websites, YouTube, or Vimeo. If you can, talk to current students or recent grads to get an idea of what the program is like. You will have questions about what is important to you in a school, so don’t hesitate to ask for answers.

 

When the time comes, visit us at our store in Newton Upper Falls or online and www.johnsonstring.com for all of your audition needs. Short of practicing for you, we have everything you need to do your best at your auditions. Good luck to all, and stayed tuned in December for another post specifically about college auditions!

Copyright © 2015 · All Rights Reserved · Silvija Kristapsons