Violin Cases: How To Choose The Best One For You

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Choosing a violin case is an important decision. While everyone is looking for something different when it comes to cases, there is one commonality everyone is looking for: a product that will protect their investment. How this can best be accomplished is an individual decision, but here are some factors to consider:

What To Look For In A Violin Case 

Fit

  • Instrument. We’ll start with the obvious: Does your instrument fit in the case? Is it secure, or does it slide around? When you close the case, does it look like nothing hits the top of the instrument? Again, you want the case to protect your investment and the less your instrument slides around, the safer it will be.
  • Bow. Do all of your bows fit inside the case? Do you want them to? Violin cases usually have between two and four bow spinners, which is enough for most players.
  • Accessories. How much extra stuff do you want to keep inside your case? Some cases have more room for things like accessories or music than others.

Portability

This means different things to different people. Think about the type of travelling and commuting you typically do with your instrument. Then, consider the following factors:

  • Weight. Some cases are lighter than others. If you are doing a lot of walking or get around using public transportation, you may want  a lighter case since you will be carrying it on your person more frequently. If you typically drive to your gigs, weight may be lower on your list of priorities.
  • Straps. How to do you like to carry your case? Check for strap configuration options–most cases allow for different variations. Also take into consideration what kinds of straps come with the case. Brands like Galaxy and BAM come with two padded backpack straps, while Bobelock comes with only one strap. (You can also purchase individual straps depending on your needs.) One more useful kind of strap to look for: the subway strap. This is the one that is attached to the scroll end of the case that allows you to hold it vertically, and can be a lifesaver on the (of course) crowded subway.
  • Shape/Style. Shaped cases tend to be more compact but fit less things, while oblong (rectangular) cases fit more things but take up more space. Half-moon cases fall somewhere in the middle.

Protection

We’re referring to two specific things when we say protection:

  • Suspension. Get a case that has suspension. Period. This means that the instrument is not touching the back or front of the case and will not absorb all of the impact if something happens. 99% of cases you look at will have suspension, but double check.
  • Climate. Do you live somewhere hot and humid? Dry and cold? Both and everything in between? Most cases on the market are at the the very least water resistant, but you may need something more waterproof or insulated depending on where you live. Most cases can be customized to accommodate the climate you live in (in-case humidifiers and case covers are two popular examples), but this is still something to keep in mind when shopping.

Still unsure what to get? Here’s a quick breakdown of the most popular brands we carry:

VN Case Chart 2

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Copyright © 2016 · All Rights Reserved · Silvija Kristapsons

Departments of JSI: Sales Department

Departments of JSI

It’s time for another installment of Departments of JSI ! This is a series that highlights the different people that work within our company. We’re able to run such a large business through the expertise of and collaboration between our different departments. Everyone has a skill that they utilize to accomplish everything from coordinating rental trips to selling instruments to repairing instruments to shipping things on time and safely. This series will help you get to know the variety of people and jobs that are done here at JSI.

Our Sales Department consists of our sales consultants and director of sales and acquisitions. These are who you talk to when you are looking to purchase an instrument, be it by phone, email, or in person. We asked them to answer a few questions about themselves:

What is your position at JSI?

Allan Espinosa: My position at Carriage House Violins of Johnson String Instrument is Senior Sales Consultant.

Matthew Fritz: Director of Sales and Acquisitions

Armenuhi Hovakimian: My position is a Violin Sales Consultant.

Robert Mayes: Cello Consultant

Phil Rush: Viola Sales Consultant

Lucy Turner: Assistant Sales Manager

Where did you study your main instrument?

Allan: I spent three years of study at the University of North Texas. I then moved to New England and completed my studies at the Boston Conservatory where I completed my BM and MM in violin performance.

Matthew: Bachelors in violin performance from Arizona State University. Masters in Orchestral Conducting from The Eastman School of Music.

Armenuhi: My education started in Armenia and then in Rochester, NY at the Eastman School of Music Prep Department. I received my Bachelors at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and my Masters in violin performance at Western Michigan University.

Robert: Walnut Hill, New England Conservatory, Julliard, Boston University

Phil: UC Riverside (composition/theory) B.A.; California Institute of the Arts, Viola Performance M.F.A.; Florida State University, Viola Performance D.M.

Lucy: I have a BMus degree in violin performance from Vanderbilt University and an MMus from Boston University.

What does a typical day look like for you?

Allan: My typical day at CHV revolves around my clients. This would include speaking with my clients to gain a better understanding of what they are looking for in an instrument, hunting down those instruments within our inventory and spending one on one time to help select a particular instrument with the player. When I am not working directly with clients, I spend time with the luthiers of the workshop, fine tuning instruments and making sure our instruments are in top condition. They day is full of communication be it face to face, on the phone or via email.

Matthew: My days are varied. Much of my time is spent evaluating instruments as potential appraisals, consignments or acquisitions and advising clients about buying and selling instruments and bows. Additionally, I oversee the sales staff and support them as they endeavor to match clients with the perfect instrument and bow. On any given day, I can be found at my desk, attending trade events, traveling for sales and acquisitions opportunities or meeting with my staff.

Armenuhi: My day begins with emails and phone calls to my clients. Then I work with our highly qualified luthiers and bow makers to adjust instruments and bows to reach the goals and needs of my clients.

Robert: I begin by practicing for 2 hours on 2-3 different cellos and 3-4 different bows. I find it important to be as familiar with the instruments as possible. When I work with my clients I want to provide them with my honest opinion of the instrument or bow. Every day at the shop is different because we work with a wide range of musicians. At the beginning of this week I was in Los Angeles with members of the LA Philharmonic and on Friday I will be working with one of the cello professors at the New England Conservatory.

Phil: My day begins with correspondence via email and phone in response to customer queries. After that I set up for any appointments I have, work with our luthiers and bow technicians on adjusting instruments and bows that need it, and reach out to my sales contacts who are looking regarding our latest acquisitions.

Lucy: The first thing I usually do in the morning is respond to client emails and return calls. Once I’m caught up there, I work with clients who have in-store appointments or I play instruments in preparation for shipping trials. A lot of my managerial duties involve inventory and getting new instruments and bows ready to trial and sell, so I take care of tasks related to that throughout the day as needed.

Do you play any secondary instruments?

Allan: I do not claim to play a secondary instrument very well but I did spend time studying piano and clarinet and have sung in choirs.

Matthew: I do not make music other than playing the violin and conducting.

Armenuhi: I played piano for 20 years.

Robert: No.

Phil: I also play piano and guitar. I guess you could say that as a violist, the violin is also a very important secondary instrument….

Lucy: Nope.

What is your favorite part of your job?

Allan: My favorite part of my job is the moment when a young musician has found the instrument that inspires creativity and pursuit of creativity in music. I also enjoy the vast array of instruments and the opportunity to work with contemporary luthiers hand in hand with the sales staff and clients.

Matthew: I enjoy many aspects of my job. The instruments are fascinating, especially then it comes to the craft and history of the violin. There is so much to learn, and even the internationally-recognized experts are constantly adding to their knowledge on a daily basis. I also enjoy traveling and meeting a variety of people from players to makers and collectors. In my position, there is never a dull moment, and you never know what a day will bring.

Armenuhi: Seeing my clients smile and working with my clients to find a great tool and the right instrument to carry their passion for music.

Robert: I enjoy being able to interact with so many musicians of all levels. Finding the right instrument or bow is crucial and I am thrilled to help people find their voice.

Phil: My greatest satisfaction comes from helping our clients find the instruments that inspire them and take them further toward their goals, whatever they may be.

Lucy: I love working with a client to figure out exactly the sound they’re looking for in an instrument or a bow. It’s really satisfying to find an instrument for a client that’s a perfect match and that they’re excited about playing.

 

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Copyright © 2016 · All Rights Reserved · Silvija Kristapsons

The Best Grad Gifts: 2016 Edition

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They did it! All of the hard work, late nights, practicing, homework and dedication have paid off. If you’re looking for ideas for what to get the grad in your life, we have a few suggestions for you:

Sheet Music

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This is a great gift in so many different forms. Maybe it’s the Urtext edition of their favorite chamber piece or a piece they have always wanted to learn. All of our folk, fiddle, jazz, pop and world music is included in the Grad Sale, which includes things like Star Wars, Disney, The Fiddler’s Fakebook and more.

A New Case

Now is a great time to invest in a new case. With brands like Bobelock and Galaxy (a JSI exclusive) on sale, this is a great option for surprising your recent grad.

Ukulele

While not included in our Grad Sale, our ukuleles start at at just $89, making them budget-friendly in addition to being an accessible instrument. Curious to learn more about the ukulele? Check out our previous post about them.

Upgrade Their Instrument

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Our Grad Sale for commercial instruments is back! Selected commercial instruments are 10% off through June 30, and you can take 15% off the bow and case when purchasing an instrument on sale as part of an outfit.

Want to purchase your rental instead? We’re offering double your first year equity when you purchase a rental instrument from us. Keep in mind that while you can always use your equity to purchase an instrument through our sales department at Carriage House Violins, this double first year offer is only available when purchasing your rental instrument.

Gift Certificates

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Always available in any amount.

Still not sure what to get them? You can’t go wrong with a gift certificate! You can purchase one in any amount (call for details) and they are valid on everything from accessories to instruments.

You can check out the products listed here and much more in store or on our website. A heartfelt congratulations to all graduating this May and June. Good luck with your future endeavors!

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Copyright © 2016 · All Rights Reserved · Silvija Kristapsons

Electric Instruments: Amps

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Finding the right amplifier can be just as difficult as finding the right electric violin. Unfortunately for us electric violinists, most amplifiers on the market are designed for guitar, specifically electric guitar. Now, any amplifier will amplify your electric violin, but you may have difficulty getting the exact tone you are looking for. Why? A violin has a much wider frequency range than a guitar, and produces many over and undertones. Through years of trial and error, I found that most electric guitar amplifiers cannot quite handle the upper octaves of a violin; they start sound quite shrill once you get to the E string.

The best solutions we have found here at Johnson String Instrument are amplifiers designed for acoustic instruments and guitars, like the Fishman Loudbox and the Roland AC series. These amps are designed to reproduce the sound of the instrument that you plug in, a tremendously helpful feature when you are trying to make your violin sound like a violin. Acoustic amplifiers can also handle the wide range of a violin, and most have anti-feedback systems which are extremely useful when you are using a pickup on an acoustic violin.

Figuring out which one to purchase? This decision is highly dependent on what you are planning. A little amplifier like the Roland Mobile AC is surprisingly loud, but would have difficulty competing with a full band. It is a great little amp for practicing, traveling and busking. If you are looking for a portable amp that is loud enough for small venues and groups, a Fishman Loudbox Mini or Roland AC-33 will do the trick. The Loudbox Mini packs a little more punch, which the AC-33 counters with an on-board looping function you can use to channel your inner Andrew Bird.

Looking for more volume to play with a rock band? The Roland AC-60 or Fishman Loudbox Artist should do the trick. If you need even more volume to compete with guitarists using tube amps and drummers with full kits who like to play loudly, you may need the power of the Fishman Loudbox Performer. The performer will allow you to be heard in any situation.

Any of these amps are a wonderful choice and will help make your electric violin sound like a violin. If you decide this isn’t what you want, you can always dive into the wonderful world of effects and add distortion, delay and modulation stomp boxes; stay tuned for more on these and other topics related to electric instruments!

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Copyright © 2016 · All Rights Reserved · Alex Wagner