Yamaha Electric Violins: Power and Performance

Congratulations, you decided to get one of the Yamaha electric violins: the YEV or the SV-200! How do you decide which one is right for you? Let’s take a look at the different instruments:

The Yamaha YEV Electric Violin

The newest of Yamaha’s electric violins and a bestseller, this instrument won Best in Show at Winter NAMM in 2016. It’s not hard to see why between it’s Mobius-inspired design and practical features. Created specifically for performance, the lightweight YEV has a built-in piezo pickup with a ¼” passive output. This means the instrument doesn’t require a battery. You can get the YEV in two different natural wood finishes and as a four- or five-string model.

This instrument is perfect for someone looking for an electric violin priced under $1000 exclusively for performance.

The Yamaha SV-200 Silent Violin

The veteran of the group, the SV-200 Silent Violin has one major difference that sets it apart from the YEV: a headphone jack. This allows for “silent” practice in addition to its standard ¼” output for performance. It includes an onboard preamp which requires a 9-volt battery, EQ adjustments that work with professional audio equipment, and dual piezo pickups for a larger dynamic range and resolution. The SV-200 is available in 4 colors.

This instrument is perfect for someone who needs something for silent practice as well as performing.

Yamaha Electric Violins: YEV vs. SV-200

Looking for something that the Yamaha electric violins don’t offer? Learn more about finding the right electric instrument and check out our complete selection of electric instruments online and in store. Our staff are always happy to help you decide which instrument works best for you!

Electric Violins: Preamps

This post is part of a series. Read our previous posts for more information about electric violins, amps and pickups.

Do I need a preamplifier for my electric violin?

Short answer: Yes. A preamplifier, or preamp, is key to getting a great tone out of an electric violin, viola or cello.

Long answer: We need to get technical.

The electric string instruments and pickups we stock at Johnson String Instrument all use variations of piezo electric sensors (piezo for short). Piezo pickups work differently than the magnetic pickups found on electric guitars; instead of sensing a string’s vibration, a piezo pickup senses an instrument’s vibration.

Piezos work best under pressure, which is why these pickup systems are usually found in or beneath the bridge of an instrument. As the instrument vibrates, the piezo generates an electrical signal that can be amplified. However, piezos have ultra high impedance outputs. In order to maximize the frequency response and tone of a piezo pickup, you must match it to an ultra high impedance input. This is what a preamp does: it buffers the impedance of your signal, making it fuller and stronger.

Why is this important? Most amplifiers and accessories on the market are designed for electric guitars and their impedance, not electric violin. Plugging a passive electric violin directly into an electric guitar amp will work, but the sound you get may not be what you were expecting.

Do I need to buy a preamp?

That depends on your setup. Many electric instruments already have on-board preamps that take care of this impedance mismatch. These instruments are what is called “active” and typically require batteries. “Passive” systems do not require batteries.  An external preamp is highly recommended with these piezo systems. The chart below shows products we carry and which category they fall into:

These passive pickup systems all produce a very strong signal so a preamp is not mandatory. However, we highly recommend a preamp to maximize your instrument’s amplified tone.

The benefits of external preamps go beyond impedance matching; all have XLR outputs, allowing you to connect easily to a PA system. This is a major time saver when playing live. When you connect to a PA, you  do not have to leave your tone up to the sound guy; most preamps feature tone-shaping EQ controls. Many preamps on the market also have boost functions, allowing you to boost your volume by a few decibels when you are ready for a solo or need help cutting through the mix.

NEXT: watch for our Preamp Buying Guide to find out which preamp is right for you.

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